Reviews

2018 Ford Edge Driving Impressions


Quick, nicely weighted steering helps give any Edge an eager feel. Steering and ride control don’t differ much from the related Fusion sedan. Ford’s electric power steering has ample on-center feel and tracks neatly on the highway.

Parking maneuvers can be accomplished without struggling back and forth with the steering wheel. Adaptive steering, standard on Titanium and Sport models, amplifies effort at lower speeds. Brakes can seem a little touchy at times, but they produce reassuring halts.

Unless big tires are mounted, the Edge’s ride is carefully composed and admirably controlled. The combination of a stiff body and an independent suspension translates to precision road feel and excellent body stability.

Performance is satisfying with any engine. Budget-minded buyers should appreciate the standard 220-horsepower turbo four, which develops smooth power even at low-end speeds, with little turbo lag.

Though low-end torque is less evident from the optional 3.5-liter V6, passing power beats that of the turbo power. More traditional than the turbo, the V6 ranks as a reliable all-around performer. Transmission downshifts are quick and crisp with each engine.

More than some vehicles dubbed Sport, the Edge variant deserves its model designation but suffers a stiff ride, battling potholes and harsh pavement. Special steering ensures lower-speed agility, but stiffer shock absorbers roughen the experience. Enthusiasts are likely to enjoy ts responsive turbo V6 and quick steering, along with the taut ride and gurgling exhaust.

Real-world fuel economy might fall short of EPA estimates. A 2017 base Edge with 2.0-liter turbo four was EPA-rated at 20/29 mpg City/Highway, or 24 mpg Combined. All-wheel drive was rated at 20/27/23 mpg. The 3.5-liter V6 was EPA-rated at 17/26 mpg City/Highway, or 20 mpg Combined with front-drive. The all-wheel-drive Sport edition, with twin-turbo V6, was rated at 17/24/19 mpg.

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